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aquarius blue: Press

the music rocks! its very cleanly produced,but real deep. Id characterize the sound as something between Tom Petty and Wilco.
heavy on the guitars, and an attitude like the Beastie Boys doing rock. its all fun and its all put out in a way that makes you want to dance or throw things in a public place.
Ben Ohmart - MusicDish (Oct 24, 2000)
Yup its modern sounding. the songs are well written and the perfomances are fine. some of the songs are calming like "Michelles Song" with its guitar hooks and smooth vocal delivery. "Dissatisfied" and "Time To Begin" are my pix of the bunch
L.A. Joe - Boston Soundcheck (Jul 16, 2000)
the first two songs, "Dissatisfied" and "On My Way" are very radio-friendly, modern rock type tunes. "Dissatisfied" is a rocker with some solid punch to it and a great choice for the opening track. "On My Way" mellows a bit more, but has a good vocal and rhythm guitar hooks. "Time To Begin" is a well grounded sleeper and one of the most original songs Ive heard in a long time.
Duke Aaron - VMAG (Dec 2, 1999)
Several of the songs on this debut sound modeled on the guitar and vocal sound of "Urge Overkill. Mr Bilodeau has a sharp ear for song structure and rock melody, and sports a smooth accessible voice. "Time To Begin is a pleasingly melancholy tune that smells like a hit, while "Hillarys" multi layered guitar showcases the good production values. Finally "My Farewell " a promising nine minute opus that showcases the technical skills of Aquarius Blues other members.
Nick West - Music Revue Magazine (Sep, 1999)
Nicely produced debut cd. Think Lou Reed in the Chili Peppers with a big dash of Dinasour Jr. Aquarius Blue crosses much terrain subtly and easily. Good disc(especially "Dissatisfied" and "My Farewell" - a cross between Skynynd's "Tuesdays Gone" and Janes Addiction's "Jane Says"
Vic Gemmingen - Geooff Wilburs Renegade Newsletter (May 16, 2000)
Aquarius Blue Is the Brainchild of Eric Bilodeau who has successfully created a musical collective that has pumped out nine tracks of free form music that shows his various rock and folk influences. From the the celtic flute inspired meets Pearl Jam rocker "The Feast" to the laid back acoustic medley of "Michelles Song" to the Soul Asylum feel of "Alien Abduction". This massachusettes native shows many sides to his musical tastes and talents. Aquarius Blue is an adventurous progect made by an adventurous musical mind that mayconfuse and confound the average MTV consumer, but on the whole, should please all types of music lovers.
Solid song blends rock, pop, and roots. Singer has occasional shades of Tom Petty!
- indie music.com (Mar, 2008)

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(Jul 10, 2008)
Artist: Aquarius Blue

CD: Forever Blue

Home: Massachusetts

Style: Rock

Quote: "Aquarius Blue makes melodic rock that somehow skirts easy categorization."


By Dan MacIntosh

Aquarius Blue illustrates its Forever Blue CD with the photo of a child sticking out his Blue Man Group-blue tongue. The music contained within is neither depressingly blue nor something akin to the blues, however. Instead, Aquarius Blue makes melodic rock that somehow skirts easy categorization.

This band doesn’t sidestep description via unusual instrumentation, however. In fact, much of the music on this 14-song offering is familiar and nearly predictable. But it’s not what they use, but how they use it, that makes Forever Blue so can’t-put-your-finger-on-it good.

Of course, a few of these songs are familiar in a quite pleasant way. For example, during “Rendezvous,” Eric Bilodeau – for all intents and purposes, Aquarius Blue – sings in a snotty, Stones-y tone. Then with “Los Banditos," the whole song takes on a Rolling Stones vibe. But there is also plenty of variety running through this recorded effort. The guitars on the aforementioned “Rendezvous” are more Peter Buck (REM) than Keith Richards. Yet a track called “Turn a Light On,” on the other hand, is slightly psychedelic.

Bilodeau’s best lyrics are the ones he put to “Certainly Unsure," which speaks about aging. It may even remind you of how Dylan once wrote: “I was so much older then, I’m younger than that now.” In this case, however, Bilodeau finds that the older he gets, the less self-assured he becomes. It’s true that the key to wisdom is realizing how much we do not know. Bilodeau is no longer so haughty as to think he has all of life figured out. The beauty in living is the ever-unfolding layers of life experience, anyhow.

“No Magic” is also a nice, moody track. Over a quiet rhythm section, Bilodeau lays down uncomplicated guitar rhythms to create an unsettling mood. Bilodeau sings this, as well as every song on the disc, with plenty of heart and soul. He makes rock & roll music, but performs his songs much like a folk troubadour.

Just don’t let a song title like “No Magic” lead you to believe there is no magic in Aquarius Blue’s music. Some of my favorite magicians are performers who can take tricks that seem overly familiar upon first glance, yet come off new and exciting before the bit is finished. Bilodeau is like that old school magician who hits the stage with a black hat and a few simple boxes atop a table. But as soon as he starts pulling colorful scarves out of his sleeves, you’re entranced as though this is something you’ve never even seen before.